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Cheer on the Dons: Tickets and Hospitality for Blackburn game

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AFC Wimbledon will be aiming to maintain the good home form shown so far in 2018 when League One leaders Blackburn visit next Tuesday and tickets are available for this match. Terrace tickets are available in advance from our online ticket shop, plus there are places also available for hospitality (see details at the bottom of this page). A cracking atmosphere in the Chemflow End helped Neal Ardley's men in pursuit of a last-gasp winner against Bristol Rovers on Saturday and tickets are available for this popular home terrace, plus the RyGas Stand (just £17 for adults). Of course, Blackburn Rovers are former Premier League Champions, having won the title back in 1995. Wimbledon faced Blackburn in the inaugural Premier League season and the home match on 19 September 1992 ended in a 1-1 draw with our manager Neal Ardley (pictured above in his playing days) on target! Alan Shearer struck the equaliser...

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FINE WINE INVESTMENT: PAST PERFORMANCES

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As we shall see, investing in fine wine is becoming more like investing in stocks and shares as the market expands, a feature attested to in many recent Liv-ex reports. This means that all investors have to be very careful as to what exactly they buy. You can’t just pick up a few cases and expect all to be well. The market is now much too broad for that. 30 years ago the range of availability was so narrow that virtually anything you bought went up in value. Not now, as is patently obvious from the evidence which follows. When assembling the portfolio a year ago we took the view that an overweight position in Bordeaux was merited as the recovery in prices from mid 2015 would lead to an improvement in confidence in the sector, and while that has been true for the ‘Super Seconds’ and the Second wines on the...

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10 Things Every Wine Lover Should Know About La Mission Haut-Brion

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This Bordeaux estate has been producing wines fit for royalty for nearly 475 years No. 1: A matter of destiny: In 1983, Château La Mission Haut-Brion became the property of Domaine Clarence Dillon – already the owners of neighboring estate Château Haut-Brion. The history of the properties shows that they were first linked right back in 1540, when Bordeaux merchant Arnaud de Lestonnac bought a parcel of land in Pessac – known as the Arregedhuys plot – that would one day form the basis of La Mission Haut-Brion. In the same year, de Lestonnac married Marie, sister of Jean de Pontac, the first significant owner of Château Haut-Brion, who had arrived there just seven years earlier. The marriage meant that the two men became brothers-in-law, and the estates became friendly rivals – although it would take almost 450 years for them to be officially joined. No. 2: Aristocratic buyout: For the formal signing of the 1983 purchase...

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Support AFC Wimbledon’s important community intitative by donating food

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The AFC Wimbledon Foundation is once again supporting the Wimbledon Foodbank by organising match day collections - and your help will be very much appreciated. Starting with the Blackpool game on Saturday, supporters will be able to make a contribution to the vital community project in High Path, South Wimbledon, which supports local families in need. Wimbledon supporters have given generously to this cause in recent years, particularly before Christmas on previous occasions. However, after being in touch with the foodbank, it was requested that we provide support at this time of year, rather than hold a Christmas collection, as their stocks are lower at this point. All the basic food and drink items are wanted at this time of year, including the following: - Cereal - Soup - Sugar - Rice - Pasta Sauce - Beans - Tinned meat - Tinned vegetables - Tea/coffee - Tinned fruit - Biscuits - Squash Please look out for the Foundation collection points at Saturday's game and another match...

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The Million-Dollar Nose

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With his stubborn disregard for the hierarchy of wines, Robert Parker, the straight-talking American wine critic, is revolutionizing the industry -- and teaching the French wine establishment some lessons it would rather not learn. THE most influential critic in the world today happens to be a critic of wine. He is not a snob or an obvious aesthete, as one might imagine, but an ordinary American, a burly, awkward, hardworking guy from the backcountry of northern Maryland, about half a step removed from the farm. His name is Robert Parker Jr., Bob for short, and he has no formal training in wine. He lives near his childhood home, among the dairies and second-growth forests in a place called Monkton, which has a post office but no town center. A new interstate highway has reduced the drive to Baltimore to merely thirty minutes, but otherwise has had little effect. Monkton remains rural...

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10 Things Every Wine Lover Should Know About Pontet-Canet

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No. 1. Betting on beards and sandals: Winemaker Jean-Michel Comme, who arrived at Château Pontet-Canet in 1989, can fairly claim responsibility for the astonishing improvements in the quality of its wine over the past few decades. This is not a man who takes his work lightly. He walks miles through the vines every day, and agonizes over every decision. Comme has his own estate – Champ des Treilles in Sainte-Foy – farmed biodynamically with his wife, Corinne, and it was his belief in the logic of biodynamics that first convinced Pontet owner Alfred Tesseron to convert. But we shouldn’t underestimate what it took for Tesseron himself to take the leap, both financially and philosophically. There were no classified Bordeaux estates that were certified biodynamic (and beyond Pontet there is still only one organically certified classified estate – Château Giraud in Sauternes), and the "beards and sandals" perception of the biodynamic approach lingered on. But Tesseron put his trust...

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2016 Bordeaux’s Greatest Hits

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© Rebecca Gibb | Figeac was one of the stand-out wines from last year's vintage. Former Wine-Searcher editor Rebecca Gibb MW goes wandering through the barrel halls of Bordeaux. There's no disputing that the 2016 vintage in Bordeaux is going to go down in history as a stunner: even as barrel samples the wines are bloody delicious. The general standard across the region is nothing short of incredible. Of course, in a region with more than 6300 winegrowers, there are going to be hits and misses, particularly when there was a drought and young vines have their roots in gravel or sandy soil. But on the whole, there are very few wines you'd put in Room 101. While the winemakers and many critics are calling this a classic; the weather in 2016 was far from classic. It rained and rained in the first half of the year – cue disease. And just when they...

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Wine Country Still Hurting After Fires

Wine Country Still Hurting After Fires

The road to recovery for area's hit by October's fires will be long and hard, commentators reckon. By Liza B. Zimmerman | Posted Monday, 27-Nov-2017  A month after some of the largest forest fires in the history of Northern California broke out, it is still difficult to get an accurate count of the real amount of damage done. Almost all of Napa, Sonoma and Mendocino's wineries, hotels and tasting rooms were closed for ten days to two weeks starting from October 8th. A month later, everyone is open for business but many of the tourists, particularly those traveling from a greater distance, have yet to come back. In multiple visits to Napa and Sonoma over the past two weeks, I have seen less-than-full tasting rooms, restaurants and hotels. So approximately two weeks of shuttered tasting room and restaurant doors would represent a three-to-four percent loss on the $7.2 billion in tourism spent by 23.6...

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EVIDENCE OF OLDEST WINE IN HUMAN HISTORY DISCOVERED

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The oldest evidence ever found of wine made using grapes has been discovered in Georgia. Some 8,000 years old it confirms that mankind’s relationship with wine is as much as 500-1,000 years older than previously thought. In a recent paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of historians and scientists laid out the biomolecular archaeological and archaeobotanical evidence for the earliest wine yet discovered. The lead author on the report was Dr Patrick McGovern of the University of Pennsylvania who has been the discoverer of numerous ancient wines and alcoholic concoctions, including the funerary wine of ‘King Midas’ (actually of his father King Gordius) and the, until today, oldest evidence of wine yet discovered; 7,000 year-old traces found in pottery from the Zagros Mountains of northern Iran. The team analysed trace evidence preserved in clay jars recently unearthed in Neolithic villages in southern Georgia, not far from...

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