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FINE WINE INVESTMENT: PAST PERFORMANCES

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As we shall see, investing in fine wine is becoming more like investing in stocks and shares as the market expands, a feature attested to in many recent Liv-ex reports. This means that all investors have to be very careful as to what exactly they buy. You can’t just pick up a few cases and expect all to be well. The market is now much too broad for that. 30 years ago the range of availability was so narrow that virtually anything you bought went up in value. Not now, as is patently obvious from the evidence which follows. When assembling the portfolio a year ago we took the view that an overweight position in Bordeaux was merited as the recovery in prices from mid 2015 would lead to an improvement in confidence in the sector, and while that has been true for the ‘Super Seconds’ and the Second wines on the...

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10 Things Every Wine Lover Should Know About La Mission Haut-Brion

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This Bordeaux estate has been producing wines fit for royalty for nearly 475 years No. 1: A matter of destiny: In 1983, Château La Mission Haut-Brion became the property of Domaine Clarence Dillon – already the owners of neighboring estate Château Haut-Brion. The history of the properties shows that they were first linked right back in 1540, when Bordeaux merchant Arnaud de Lestonnac bought a parcel of land in Pessac – known as the Arregedhuys plot – that would one day form the basis of La Mission Haut-Brion. In the same year, de Lestonnac married Marie, sister of Jean de Pontac, the first significant owner of Château Haut-Brion, who had arrived there just seven years earlier. The marriage meant that the two men became brothers-in-law, and the estates became friendly rivals – although it would take almost 450 years for them to be officially joined. No. 2: Aristocratic buyout: For the formal signing of the 1983 purchase...

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The Million-Dollar Nose

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With his stubborn disregard for the hierarchy of wines, Robert Parker, the straight-talking American wine critic, is revolutionizing the industry -- and teaching the French wine establishment some lessons it would rather not learn. THE most influential critic in the world today happens to be a critic of wine. He is not a snob or an obvious aesthete, as one might imagine, but an ordinary American, a burly, awkward, hardworking guy from the backcountry of northern Maryland, about half a step removed from the farm. His name is Robert Parker Jr., Bob for short, and he has no formal training in wine. He lives near his childhood home, among the dairies and second-growth forests in a place called Monkton, which has a post office but no town center. A new interstate highway has reduced the drive to Baltimore to merely thirty minutes, but otherwise has had little effect. Monkton remains rural...

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Bitcoin in a Bottle – The Investment Wines

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We look at which wines have provided the best returns over the past five years and find some surprises. By Don Kavanagh | Posted Saturday, 09-Dec-2017 It's a hoary old story, so often repeated that it has almost become an urban myth – if you had invested $100 in Bitcoin in 2011, you'd be a millionaire today. Of course, there would have been some fairly hair-raising ups and downs along the way, but if you had invested your $100 in the cryptocurrency you could have realised your investment on November 29 at a tidy $3,773,758.93. Of all the investment options, Bitcoin is the only one that has seriously challenged wine for returns in the past five years or so. Wine had better returns than real estate, gold and stocks last year and the top end appreciates at dizzying speed. Take a look at the big names of Burgundy – DRC, Leroy, Jayer and the rest...

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Brexit could have as much impact on the UK economy as the CREDIT CRUNCH

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  David Davis was appearing before the parliamentary Brexit select committee  He said quitting the EU is a 'paradigm change' comparable to the 2008 crash He admitted Whitehall has not carried out sectoral Brexit impact assessments  Comes in crucial week for Brexit with the PM under pressure to rescue the deal By Kate Ferguson, Political Correspondent For Mailonline PUBLISHED: 10:37, 6 December 2017 | UPDATED: 16:07, 6 December 2017 Brexit could have as big an impact on the British economy as the 2008 credit crunch, David Davis warned today. The Brexit Secretary said quitting the Brussels club will amount to a 'paradigm change' comparable with the biggest financial slump since the Depression of the 1930s. He made the extraordinary comment as he was called before the Brexit select committee where he admitted no Brexit impact assessments have been carried out by Whitehall. He said an assessment of the potential impact of Brexit on different sectors of the UK economy would not...

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2016 Bordeaux’s Greatest Hits

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© Rebecca Gibb | Figeac was one of the stand-out wines from last year's vintage. Former Wine-Searcher editor Rebecca Gibb MW goes wandering through the barrel halls of Bordeaux. There's no disputing that the 2016 vintage in Bordeaux is going to go down in history as a stunner: even as barrel samples the wines are bloody delicious. The general standard across the region is nothing short of incredible. Of course, in a region with more than 6300 winegrowers, there are going to be hits and misses, particularly when there was a drought and young vines have their roots in gravel or sandy soil. But on the whole, there are very few wines you'd put in Room 101. While the winemakers and many critics are calling this a classic; the weather in 2016 was far from classic. It rained and rained in the first half of the year – cue disease. And just when they...

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EVIDENCE OF OLDEST WINE IN HUMAN HISTORY DISCOVERED

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The oldest evidence ever found of wine made using grapes has been discovered in Georgia. Some 8,000 years old it confirms that mankind’s relationship with wine is as much as 500-1,000 years older than previously thought. In a recent paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team of historians and scientists laid out the biomolecular archaeological and archaeobotanical evidence for the earliest wine yet discovered. The lead author on the report was Dr Patrick McGovern of the University of Pennsylvania who has been the discoverer of numerous ancient wines and alcoholic concoctions, including the funerary wine of ‘King Midas’ (actually of his father King Gordius) and the, until today, oldest evidence of wine yet discovered; 7,000 year-old traces found in pottery from the Zagros Mountains of northern Iran. The team analysed trace evidence preserved in clay jars recently unearthed in Neolithic villages in southern Georgia, not far from...

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AFC WIMBLEDON WINE TASTING EVENT

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Well done to AFC Wimbledon's Business Team on hosting a fantastic wine tasting networking event. In the above image above you can see several of our staff listening intently to the wine expert. We look forward to your next event! https://www.afcwimbledonbusinessclub.co.uk/events      ...

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Battling Dons prove a match for Peterborough as they earn point

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By Rob Cornell Wimbledon produced a battling display as they matched Peterborough United in front of the live TV cameras. Lyle Taylor opened the scoring inside the first minute and Cody McDonald notched his first Dons league goal in a 2-2 draw, as Wimbledon produced a strong team performance and weren’t to be denied when the visitors turned the score around in the first-half. There were two changes to the line-up that beat Lincoln City in the FA Cup first round over a week ago. George Francomb returned on the left side of defence for Callum Kennedy (back injury), while Liam Trotter came back into centre midfield in the absence of Jimmy Abdou – who was away on international duty with Comoros. Wimbledon got off to the perfect start when Harry Forrester’s ball found Taylor on the right-hand side of the penalty area. The Dons striker kept up his excellent run of form with...

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